Tag Archives: culture

Watch: Digital Burnout: What Can We Do?

By | May 7, 2020

Kelly Murdoch-Kitt, assistant professor at the Stamps School of Art & Design, is a user experience designer and educator focused on people, systems and interpersonal interactions. In a recent interview published on the U-M Arts & Culture site, she discusses tactics for remote learning and working, many of which are taken from a book that she co-authored, which… Read More »

At home during Coronavirus pandemic? U-M offers online courses, exhibits, speakers

By | March 20, 2020

Living rooms around the world can become places to learn how to start a business for social impact or to peek inside a museum to see homemade ancient wooden toy horses from Roman Egypt. U-M is providing multiple opportunities to learn and explore online while staying at home during the coronavirus pandemic: U-M’s art and performance organizations and… Read More »

Practice and encourage good digital citizenship 

Do your part to support online civility and practice and promote good digital citizenship. Be responsible and respectful in self expression, and expect respect from those you interact with. Help care for digital resources by encouraging good security practices. Respect others’ privacy, and take steps to protect your own privacy by staying aware of what you share online.… Read More »

March 18: “What Does Big Tech Owe Us?”

Wallace House presents Recode’s Kara Swisher interviewing Alex Stamos live on stage at U-M’s Hill Auditorium, March 18, at 6:30 p.m. This event is co-sponsored by ITS, the Dissonance Event Series, and others. Huge tech companies have changed the way we live. Google, Amazon, Facebook, and Apple have built unprecedented reach into our pocketbooks, privacy, individual liberties, and… Read More »

Attend “What Does Big Tech Owe Us?” March 18

Wallace House presents Recode’s Kara Swisher interviewing Alex Stamos live on stage at U-M’s Hill Auditorium, March 18, at 6:30 p.m. This event is co-sponsored by ITS, the Dissonance Event Series, and others. Huge tech companies have changed the way we live. Google, Amazon, Facebook, and Apple have built unprecedented reach into our pocketbooks, privacy, individual liberties, and… Read More »

New U-M research center to focus on ethical, equitable practices in computing technology

By | January 21, 2020

Society’s ever-increasing use of artificial intelligence and other emerging computing technologies has led many in the field to talk about the need for ethics, standards, and policies to help guide their use. Among the concerns over the increasing use of AI and data-based algorithms are gender and racial stereotyping, and an overall lack of accountability and digital justice.… Read More »

Plan to attend “What Does Big Tech Owe Us?” March 18

Wallace House—along with co-sponsors ITS and the Dissonance Event Series—will present Recode’s Kara Swisher interviewing Alex Stamos live on stage at U-M’s Hill Auditorium on March 18, 2020, at 6:30 p.m. Save the date on your calendar now. Kara Swisher is co-founder and executive editor of Recode and host of the weekly interview podcast “Recode Decode.” She is… Read More »

Temporary social profiles may help adults vet feedback on sensitive topics

Temporary social profiles are being used for more than just online scams and disinformation. Tawfiq Ammari, a PhD candidate in the School of Information, says these “throwaway” accounts might help adults collect helpful comments and feedback on “socially stigmatizing” topics such as divorce, postpartum depression, and mental health.

Computer science classes may have positive social effects

Researchers from U-M, Cornell University, and the Nairobi Play project studied the social and cultural effects of computer science classes. The researchers found that computer science classes can encourage children to work together overcome cultural barriers. Kentaro Toyama, a professor in the School of Information, was part of the team. The researchers interviewed and observed children from a… Read More »

Gamified childhood: Are digital devices replacing traditional playtime?

By | October 25, 2019

Blocks, books and bikes used to be the staples of childhood. But as more kids grow up with a seemingly endless menu of virtual activities offered through digital media, child development experts worry about the wane of traditional playtime. Jenny Radesky, a pediatrician at U-M’s C.S. Mott Children’s Hospital, who is addressing the topic at the national American Academy of Pediatrics meeting in… Read More »

Colleges need to focus on societal impact of new tech

In a recent article in “The Chronicle of Higher Education”, Shobita Parthasarathy, professor at the Gerald R. Ford School of Public Policy, called on colleges to teach future scientists, engineers, and policy makers, to think critically about the societal impact of new technologies. “Colleges must train the next generation of scientists, engineers, and policy makers to think more… Read More »

U-M experts wary of digital monitoring of mental health to help stop gun violence

By | September 16, 2019

A lack of evidence that mental illness is to blame for the U.S.’s spate of mass shootings has not deterred the Trump administration from considering proposed solutions to gun violence based on that belief. A recent one, called SAFEHOME, would use “real-time data analytics” and information gleaned from personal digital devices to identify individuals who might become violent. … Read More »

SI’s Ericson talks women in computer science with BBC

By | September 12, 2019

In the movie “Hidden Figures,” the computing power of a group of women drove successes in the early space program. In fact, the early history of computer science is filled with stories of the accomplishments of women. So why aren’t more women interested in computing careers? UMSI assistant professor Barbara Ericson has some thoughts. Much of her research has centered on… Read More »

Millennials are the most tech-saturated generation of parents yet

By | September 4, 2019

The spectrum of digital child-rearing resources for millennial parents is huge. Beyond social media and forums and Google, there are smartphone apps that log the duration of every breast-feeding session, record an infant’s nap times to the minute, and send push notifications reminding parents of upcoming developmental milestones. Those tools can be useful. But when it comes to… Read More »

Upcoming Dissonance events explore the intersection of technology, art, and the environment

By | August 30, 2019

September 12, 2019: Cyborg Arts The Penny Stamps Speaker Series, along with co-sponsor Dissonance, presents Cyborg Arts, with Neil Harbisson and Moon Ribas. The artists ask us to consider: “What separates human beings from the technology we create and use?” The Catalan-based artists and self-identified cyborgs are influencers in the global cyborg art movement who use the internet as a sense to… Read More »

Reclaiming indigenous forms of knowledge through “ethno-computing”

By | August 29, 2019

Ron Eglash, professor of information and of art and design, was recently featured in a wide-ranging interview on NPR affiliate WBEZ’s program Worldview. Eglash discusses his passion for bringing the sophisticated math and computing ideas at the center of cultural traditions to classroom settings to inspire underrepresented students to pursue studies in STEM fields.  According to Eglash, indigenous… Read More »

It’s like traveling without moving: How to work remotely abroad and maintain your sanity

A short while ago I had an opportunity to work abroad for a brief period. After securing approval from my supervisor and making the necessary arrangements, I discovered that working remotely not only allowed me to keep up on various projects, but to make headway while enjoying time out of the country.  The experience of working while traveling… Read More »