Tag Archives: culture

U-M experts wary of digital monitoring of mental health to help stop gun violence

By | September 16, 2019

A lack of evidence that mental illness is to blame for the U.S.’s spate of mass shootings has not deterred the Trump administration from considering proposed solutions to gun violence based on that belief. A recent one, called SAFEHOME, would use “real-time data analytics” and information gleaned from personal digital devices to identify individuals who might become violent. … Read More »

SI’s Ericson talks women in computer science with BBC

By | September 12, 2019

In the movie “Hidden Figures,” the computing power of a group of women drove successes in the early space program. In fact, the early history of computer science is filled with stories of the accomplishments of women. So why aren’t more women interested in computing careers? UMSI assistant professor Barbara Ericson has some thoughts. Much of her research has centered on… Read More »

Millennials are the most tech-saturated generation of parents yet

By | September 4, 2019

The spectrum of digital child-rearing resources for millennial parents is huge. Beyond social media and forums and Google, there are smartphone apps that log the duration of every breast-feeding session, record an infant’s nap times to the minute, and send push notifications reminding parents of upcoming developmental milestones. Those tools can be useful. But when it comes to… Read More »

Upcoming Dissonance events explore the intersection of technology, art, and the environment

By | August 30, 2019

September 12, 2019: Cyborg Arts The Penny Stamps Speaker Series, along with co-sponsor Dissonance, presents Cyborg Arts, with Neil Harbisson and Moon Ribas. The artists ask us to consider: “What separates human beings from the technology we create and use?” The Catalan-based artists and self-identified cyborgs are influencers in the global cyborg art movement who use the internet as a sense to… Read More »

Reclaiming indigenous forms of knowledge through “ethno-computing”

By | August 29, 2019

Ron Eglash, professor of information and of art and design, was recently featured in a wide-ranging interview on NPR affiliate WBEZ’s program Worldview. Eglash discusses his passion for bringing the sophisticated math and computing ideas at the center of cultural traditions to classroom settings to inspire underrepresented students to pursue studies in STEM fields.  According to Eglash, indigenous… Read More »

It’s like traveling without moving: How to work remotely abroad and maintain your sanity

A short while ago I had an opportunity to work abroad for a brief period. After securing approval from my supervisor and making the necessary arrangements, I discovered that working remotely not only allowed me to keep up on various projects, but to make headway while enjoying time out of the country.  The experience of working while traveling… Read More »

Tech equity and redesigning Detroit

By | June 17, 2019

U-M professors were a key part of the DIA Plaza/Midtown Cultural Connections international design competition’s winning submission, called Detroit Square. The project provides the opportunity “to leapfrog the current generation of technology and do something that is very progressive and future proof,” said team member John Marshall, an associate professor at the Stamps School of Art & Design.… Read More »

Is ‘digital addiction’ a real threat to kids?

By | June 3, 2019

There’s a great deal of talk these days about “digital addiction.” But several experts from U-M say we should teach kids to think of screens as something to handle in moderation rather than something without any healthy place in our lives. Ellen Selkie, an assistant professor of adolescent medicine, who does research on adolescents’ use of social media,… Read More »

Michigan Meeting explores living in the digital age, May 9-10

By | May 1, 2019

A group of U-M faculty members have set out to ask critical questions about how today’s digital environment affects personal and societal well-being, perceptions and livelihoods. In other words, what does it mean to be alive in the digital age? That question is the focus of “Living a Digital Life,” the 2019 Michigan Meeting scheduled for May 9-10… Read More »

Dissonance: Understanding the Social Implications of AI, April 17

By | April 11, 2019

Through mobile phones, the Internet of Things, and web computing, every single day around the globe we create a quintillion bytes of data. Pairing that trove of data with enormous computational power, Artificial Intelligence (AI) is making strides into every aspect of everyday living, from emails and targeted advertising, to healthcare and education. But with great power comes… Read More »

University researchers examine how data science can interpret music

By | April 8, 2019

Last week, students and professors conducted live research in Hill Auditorium during a musical performance and informational presentation before nearly 200 community members. James Kibbie, chair of the School of Music, Theatre & Dance Organ Department, and Daniel Forger, professor of mathematics, received a grant from the Michigan Institute for Data Science to collaborate on the analysis of… Read More »

Reading to your toddler? Print books are better than digital ones

By | March 28, 2019

In a study recently published in the journal “Pediatrics,” researchers at U-M found that parents and toddlers reading print books together resulted in a more engaging experience than reading together using an electronic device. Tiffany Munzer, a fellow in developmental behavioral pediatrics at the C.S. Mott Children’s Hospital, who was the first author on the study, said the… Read More »

U-M part of network to build public interest technology field

By | March 12, 2019

The University of Michigan has joined the Public Interest Technology University Network, a new partnership of 21 colleges and universities dedicated to building the nascent field of public interest technology and growing a new generation of civic-minded technologists. Started by the Ford Foundation, Hewlett Foundation, and New America, the network represents a powerful alignment across sectors as part… Read More »

Built by humans. Ruled by computers.

By | February 7, 2019

MiDAS, an algorithm-based administration and fraud collection system implemented by the state of Michigan, ran without human intervention between 2013 and 2015. During that time, it accused about 50,000 Michiganders of unemployment fraud. A 2017 review by the state found that more than 90 percent of those accusations were false. A growing number of people have been harmed… Read More »

Most patients wary, unaware of benefits of using health portals

By | December 4, 2018

Two-thirds of patients who visited a doctor in 2017 did not use a health portal that could help improve their health in the long run, according to a new study by U-M. Health portals—secure online websites that give patients 24-hour access to health information—can enhance patients’ engagement in their own health, said lead author Denise Anthony, professor of… Read More »

Changing the conversation: Seniors and technology

By | December 3, 2018

Stereotypes of seniors confused by and struggling with technology might be amusing, but not necessarily accurate, says School of Information researcher Robin Brewer, an SI presidential postdoctoral fellow. Technology isn’t necessarily befuddling for older adults in and of itself, says Brewer. Most of the challenges are because of changes in abilities that make traditional devices and systems tougher for… Read More »