Microsoft Azure cloud computing credits awarded, credits still available

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The Michigan Institute for Data Science (MIDAS) and Information and Technology Services (ITS) recently partnered with Microsoft Azure to offer cloud computing credits to U-M faculty members for both research and teaching projects.  

Congratulations to the following faculty members who received awards for their projects. 

Emily Mower Provost, associate professor of electrical engineering and computer science, College of Engineering, will use the credits to study emotional well-being using speech-sensors like speaker-phone microphone on smartphones to regularly sample an individual’s ambient acoustic environment. The goal is to better understand the link between emotion and health, social, and vocational outcomes.

Harsha V. Madhyastha, associate professor of electrical engineering and computer science, College of Engineering, will use the credits to track down web pages whose URLs have changed. The goal is to improve the user experience on the web by finding aliases for up to 10 million broken URLs. 

James Omartian, assistant professor of accounting, Stephen M. Ross School of Business, will use the credits to measure consumer responses to sales tax. The project will uncover which types of consumers are most sensitive to sales tax, what types of retail establishments are most susceptible to its adverse effect, and if consumers respond differently to taxes specific to a local region. The project will also assess the prevalence of cross-border travel to avoid paying sales tax in high-rate jurisdictions.

Gengxin Li, associate professor of statistics, College of Arts, Sciences and Letters, UM-Dearborn, and Jennifer Zhao, professor of mathematics, College of Arts, Sciences and Letters, UM-Dearborn, will use the credits for a graduate level statistical analysis course. It is designed to broaden the student’s understanding of the multivariate analysis technique which has become a powerful and popular computational tool in biostatistics, environmental science, engineering and data science.
Credits are still available.

Apply today for research and teaching projects that need cloud computing credits